The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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"Sir" Salman Rushdie: A Thoughtful Reaction

Here is a round-up of the calm, collected, and very in-depth, well-considered Pakistani Islamist response to the knighting of Salman Rushdie (h/t lgf):

Pakistan's religious students burn effigies of Queen Elizabeth II and author Salman Rushdie condemning the knighthood award to Rushdie in Multan, Pakistan, Sunday, June 17, 2007. Pakistani lawmakers passed a government-backed resolution Monday demanding Britain withdraw the knighthood awarded to author Salman Rushdie, condemning the honor as an insult to the religious sentiments of Muslims. (AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer)


Of course, some will say that this will inflame the anger of the Middle East... but then again, when is their anger not ablaze?

Updates:

Day Four, Day Three, Day Two
Pakistan's religious students chant slogans condemning the knighthood award to author Salman Rushdie in Multan, Pakistan, Sunday, June 17, 2007. Pakistani lawmakers passed a government-backed resolution demading Britain withdraw the knighthood awarded to Rushdie, as insult to the religious sentiments of Muslims. Later they burned effigies of Rushdie and Queen Elizabeth II. (AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer)


They're such slackers: Those effigies don't look anything like Salmon Rushdie or Her Majesty!

Activists of Jamiat Talaba-e-Arabia chant slogans against Salman Rushdie in Multan June 17, 2007. Iran condemned on Sunday the awarding of a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "The Satanic Verses" prompted Iran's late leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to issue a fatwa death warrant for him. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer (PAKISTAN)


Activists of Jamiat Talaba-e-Arabia protest against the awarding a knighthood to Salman Rushie in Multan June 17, 2007. Iran condemned on Sunday the awarding of a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "The Satanic Verses" prompted Iran's late leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to issue a fatwa death warrant for him. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer (PAKISTAN)


Activists of Jamiat Talaba-e-Arabia chant slogans against Salman Rushdie as they burn his effigy in Multan June 17, 2007. Pakistan deplored on Monday Britain's decision to award a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims around the world. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer


Pakistan's religious students burn effigies of Queen Elizabeth II and author Salman Rushdie condemning the knighthood award to Rushdie in Multan, Pakistan, Sunday, June 17, 2007. Pakistani lawmakers passed a government-backed resolution Monday, June 18, demanding Britain withdraw the knighthood awarded to author Salman Rushdie, condemning the honor as an insult to the religious sentiments of Muslims. (AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer)

 Tags: salman rushdie asim tanveer khalid tanveer AP REUTERS Your Protest Stinks


Comments:

#1 Haseeb 18-Jun-2007
i think the pics above truly represent the thought of an ordinary Muslim and the queen should not have called that bastard salman rushdi ,sir
#2 Brian C. Ledbetter 18-Jun-2007
And yet, the irony of the West referring to Islam as the "religion of peace" will continue to be lost on you and your compatriots.

Shocking, that.

Salaam,
Brian
#3 Berlin27 02-Jul-2008
This is what Rushdie writes for the Queen of Britain. "chamcha.....he found himself dreaming of the Queen, of making tender love to the Monarch. She was the body of Britain, the avatar of the State, and he had chosen her, joined with her; she was his Beloved, the moon of his delight.". Chamcha refers to the character of Rushdiie himself. Amazing, he writes about conjoining with the Queen and the Queen awards him with Knighthood. Amazing!!!
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