The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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"Sir" Salman Rushdie: Day Three

Here're the latest photos from the wave of love and joy for Salman Rushdie. I'm still expecting Friday to be the most dramatic set so far, but we're still seeing plenty of good old-fashioned entertainment until then.

Rt: "BRITISH GOVERNMENT TAKE APOLOGY FROM THE ALL MUSLIM[s] OF THE WORLD."


I'm sure the British Embassy would be more than delighted to hear your apologies, good sirs.

See-Also:

Day Four, Day Two, Day One, Love Letter from Londonistan, Hot Air
Pakistani Muslims shouting slogans during a demonstration in Hyderabad. Anger mounted in the Muslim world over Britain's knighthood for novelist Salman Rushdie, with protests spreading to Malaysia for the first time and fresh demonstrations in Pakistan.(AFP/Rehan Khan)


Pakistani Muslims carry placards and shout slogans during a demonstration in Hyderabad. Anger mounted in the Muslim world over Britain's knighthood for novelist Salman Rushdie, with protests spreading to Malaysia for the first time and fresh demonstrations in Pakistan.(AFP/Rehan Khan)


Some goodies that I missed yesterday:

Pakistani Islamists chant slogans in front of a burning effigy of Indian born author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Karachi, 19 June 2007. Pakistan summoned Britain's ambassador to the foreign ministry as Islamists torched effigies of Queen Elizabeth and Salman Rushdie in fresh protests against the author's knighthood.(AFP/Asif Hassan)


Pakistani Islamists gather around the burning effigy of Indian born author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Karachi, 19 June 2007. Pakistan summoned Britain's ambassador to the foreign ministry as Islamists torched effigies of Queen Elizabeth and Salman Rushdie in fresh protests against the author's knighthood.(AFP/Asif Hassan)


Pakistani Islamists chant slogans during a protest in Karachi, 19 June 2007, against Salman Rushdie. Pakistan summoned Britain's ambassador to the foreign ministry as Islamists torched effigies of Queen Elizabeth and Salman Rushdie in fresh protests against the author's knighthood.(AFP/Asif Hassan)


The fire, of course, is spreading throughout the entire "Ummah." Burn, baby, burn!

A supporter of Malaysia's Islamic party prays during a protest outside the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur June 20, 2007. The protest was against the award of a knighthood to Salman Rushdie, whose novel the 'Satanic Verses' outraged Muslims worldwide. (Zainal Abd Halim/Reuters)


A supporter of Malaysia's Islamic party shouts slogans during a protest outside the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur June 20, 2007. The protest was against the award of a knighthood to Salman Rushdie, whose novel the 'Satanic Verses' outraged Muslims worldwide. (Zainal Abd Halim/Reuters)


A demonstrator shouts slogans as police officers with riot shields stand by during a protest outside the British High Commission in Kuala Lumpur. Anger mounted in the Muslim world over Britain's knighthood for novelist Salman Rushdie, with protests spreading to Malaysia for the first time and fresh demonstrations in Pakistan.(AFP/Tengku Bahar)


A Pakistani girl participates in a rally organized by a religious party to condemn the British government for awarding knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie outside the Parliament in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan summoned the British ambassador to protest that author Salman Rushdie, accused of insulting Islam in his novel 'The Satanic Verses, was to be honored with a knighthood. (AP Photo/B.K.Bangash)


Poor girl doesn't realise that Tony Blair has nothing to do with the bestowing of Knighthood on any given individual.

Activists of Pakistan's religious party hold a protest rally to condemn the British government for awarding knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie outside the Parliament in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan summoned the British ambassador to protest that author Salman Rushdie, accused of insulting Islam in his novel 'The Satanic Verses, was to be honored with a knighthood. (AP Photo/B.K.Bangash)


An activist of the Sunni Tehreek party chants slogans against British author Salman Rushdie in Hyderabad, 160 km (100 miles) from Karachi June 20, 2007. Pakistan summoned the British ambassador on Tuesday and told him awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie was insensitive and contrary to efforts to foster understanding between religions. (Akram Shahid/Reuters)


Activists of Pakistan's religious party hold a protest rally holding their party flags with writing 'There is no God but God: Mohammad is the Prophet of God,' to condemn the British government for awarding knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie outside the Parliament in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan summoned the British ambassador to protest that author Salman Rushdie, accused of insulting Islam in his novel 'The Satanic Verses, was to be honored with a knighthood. (Photo/B.K.Bangash)


Update: Here are the latest photos, in no particular order. I'll hopefully get them all sorted out soon.

Pakistani Muslims burn effigies of Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Indian born author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Multan. Outrage mounted in the Muslim world Wednesday over Britain's knighthood for Rushdie, with protests spreading to Malaysia and a top Pakistani cleric calling for the novelist to be killed.(AFP/Mohammad Malik)


Pakistani women of the fundamentalist Jamaat-e-Islami party march during a protest rally in front of Parliament House in Islamabad accusing Britain of "provoking" Muslims by awarding a knighthood to Salman Rushdie. Anger mounted in the Muslim world Wednesday over Britain's knighthood for Rushdie, with protests spreading to Malaysia for the first time and fresh demonstrations in Pakistan.(AFP/Aamir Qureshi)


Pakistani Muslims shout slogans in front of a burning British flag during a protest rally in Karachi, accusing Britian of "provoking" Muslims by awarding a knighthood to Salman Rushdie. Outrage mounted in the Muslim world Wednesday over Britain's knighthood for Rushdie, with protests spreading to Malaysia and a top Pakistani cleric calling for the novelist to be killed.(AFP/Asif Hassan)


Supporters of opposition party Pakistan Muslim League (PML-N) chant slogans to denounce British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Peshawar June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Ali imam(PAKISTAN)


Supporters of opposition party Pakistan Muslim League chant slogans to denounce Indian-born British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Peshawar June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce Britain's award of a knighthood to Rushdie, whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims worldwide and prompted death threats. REUTERS/Ali imam (PAKISTAN)


A boy stands on a poster of British author Salman Rushdie during a Shi'ite Muslim rally in Lahore June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel the "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza (PAKISTAN)


Shi'ite Muslims burn a poster depicting pictures of British author Salman Rushdie, in Lahore June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighhood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel the "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza (PAKISTAN)


Shi'ite Muslims burn a poster with pictures of British author Salman Rushdie in Lahore June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel the "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza (PAKISTAN)


Pakistani Muslims torch posters of author Salman Rushdie and an US flag during a protest rally in Lahore. Outrage mounted in the Muslim world over Britain's knighthood for Rushdie, with protests spreading to Malaysia and a top Pakistani cleric calling for the novelist to be killed.(AFP/Sameed Qureshi)


That last one's real cute, considering that the United States has no part in deciding who becomes a Knight of the British Empire...

Activists of Pakistan's religious party hold a protest rally holding their party flags with writing 'There is no God but God: Mohammad is the Prophet of God,' to condemn the British government for awarding a knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie, outside the Parliament in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan and Iran have summoned their British ambassadors to protest against Rushdie's knighthood award. (Photo/B.K.Bangash)


Pakistani Shiite clerics shouts slogans against the British government for awarding a knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie, in Lahore, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan and Iran have summoned their British ambassadors to protest against Rushdie's knighthood award. (Photo/K.M.Chaudary)


Activists from the Jamiat Ulma-e-Pakistan party burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie in Multan June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Rushdie, whose novel the "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer (PAKISTAN)


Activists from the Jamiat Ulma-e-Pakistan party burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie in Multan June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Rushdie, whose novel the "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer (PAKISTAN)


Activists from the Sunni Tehreek party chant slogans against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 20, 2007. Pakistan summoned the British ambassador on Tuesday and told him awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie was insensitive and contrary to efforts to foster understanding between religions. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


Pakistani protesters rally against the British government for awarding a knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan and Iran have summoned their British ambassadors to protest against Rushdie's knighthood award. Placard in center reads 'Boycott Britain products.' (Photo/Shakil Adil)


Pakistani protesters chant slogans against the British government for awarding a knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan and Iran have summoned their British ambassadors to protest against Rushdie's knighthood award. (Photo/Shakil Adil)


Pakistani protesters beat an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie at a rally against the British government for awarding a knighthood to him, in Karachi, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan and Iran have summoned their British ambassadors to protest against Rushdie's knighthood award. (Photo/Shakil Adil)


... I fail to see the resemblance.

Activists from the Sunni Tehreek party chant slogans against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 20, 2007. Pakistan summoned the British ambassador on Tuesday and told him awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie was insensitive and contrary to efforts to foster understanding between religions. The banner reads " We condemn the British government's decision to award knighthood to Rushdie". REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


Supporters of Islamist alliance Mutahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) march during a protest rally outside the Parliament House in Islamabad June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood (PAKISTAN)


Activists of Sunni Tehreek party burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 20, 2007. Pakistan summoned the British ambassador on Tuesday and told him awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie was insensitive and contrary to efforts to foster understanding between religions. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


Supporters of the Islamist alliance Mutahida Majlis-e-Amal hold placards during a protest outside Parliament House in Islamabad June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood (PAKISTAN)


Women supporters of Islamist alliance Mutahida Majlis-e-Amal hold placards during a protest rally outside Parliament House in Islamabad June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide.REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood (PAKISTAN)


A child stands next to a placard during a protest rally organised by the Islamist alliance Mutahida Majlis-e-Amal outside parliament house in Islamabad June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood (PAKISTAN)


A Pakistani girl participates in a rally organized by a religious party to condemn the British government for awarding a knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie outside the Parliament in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 20, 2007. Pakistan and Iran have summoned their British ambassadors to protest against Rushdie's knighthood award. (Photo/B.K.Bangash)


A supporter of the Islamist alliance Mutahida Majlis-e-Amal takes part in a protest rally outside parliament house in Islamabad June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood(PAKISTAN)


A supporter of the Islamist alliance Mutahida Majlis-e-Amal takes part in a protest rally outside parliament house in Islamabad June 20, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood(PAKISTAN)

 Tags: salman rushdie akram shahid asif hassan rehan khan tengku bahar zainal abd halim AFP AP REUTERS Your Protest Stinks


Comments:

#1 Stuart Booth 20-Jun-2007
See, I have to take offence at the burning of effigies and flags, a couple of cartoons and a title should not cause this kind of response.

Salman Rushdie is my hero. He wasnt until quite recently, but he is now, a proper brit, he says what he thinks even when he knows it will cause trouble - same for the Queen (who I didnt really respect until this) Well done my love - perhaps more titles could be conferred on him?
#2 Ace of Spades HQ 20-Jun-2007
I've got a brownout going in my area, power on for five minutes then off for twenty or thirty, so I'm not sure how much blogging I can actually do. Here's an open thread for headlines and stuff. Some good...
#3 Brian C. Ledbetter 20-Jun-2007
...

Hmm, I wonder if we can't convince the Pope to grant Sainthood to Salman. "Saint Rushdie" does have something of a ring to it, though I'm going to have to go thumb through my copy of [i]Fox's Book of Martyrs[/i] and see if there's a category for "Bad Authorship."

:)

In any case, may God keep Sir Rushdie safe!

Regards,
Brian
#4 20-Jun-2007
I wonder how much foreign aid Britain (still) gives to Pakistan? - in the name of "her Majesty's Government" of course!
I'm beginning to despise the very word 'Muslim'
#5 JD 21-Jun-2007
The Pope should Canonize Charles Martel and Jan Sobieski for stopping the 1st and 2nd Moslem invasions of Europe.
#6 Mark 21-Jun-2007
OH, those peace loving muslims always have exciting friday gatherings, now don't they. :)
#7 Garrett Heaney 04-Jul-2007
Wow, this is great photographic coverage of the past few days. We just released an article on Rushdie and the importance of protecting free speech in our magazine Wishtank: Journal of intellectual freedom. It can be found at www.wishtank.org .

I’d be curious as to what you think about the comments The New York Times made that likened the protection of free speech to religious acculturation. Feel free to email me at editor@wishtank.org if you ever want to share anything.

humbly.
Garrett Heaney
Founding Editor
Wishtank magazine
www.wishtank.org
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