The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

<<
 >
>>
"Sir" Salman Rushdie: Day Four

Salman Rushdie's knighthood: The Gift that Keeps On Giving.

A Kashmiri girl looks at an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie before the start of a protest in Srinagar June 21, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Srinagar on Thursday to denounce a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. The placard on the effigy reads, "Hang apostate Salman Rushdie". REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


This effigy is the closest I've seen so far. Of course, I'm still anticipating worldwide joy from the Inflamed Ummah (tm) tomorrow, but until then, this is still money.

See-Also:

Day Three, Day Two, Day One, Love Letter from Londonistan
Run for your life--the lawyers are getting involved:

Pakistani lawyers hold a rally to condemn the British government for awarding knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie in Lahore, Pakistan. The decision to award Rushdie a knighthood has sparked a harsh reaction throughout much of the Muslim world. (AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary)


And now the Kashmiris are getting in on the fun. You know what that means, don't ya? Yeah, I'll be watching the wires for his face, too...

Kashmiri protesters hold a banner as they shout slogans against British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Srinagar June 21, 2007. (Fayaz Kabli/Reuters)


Kashmiri protesters shout slogans against British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Srinagar June 21, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Srinagar on Thursday to denounce a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Activists of Jammu Kashmir Peoples Freedom League shout slogans against Britain and writer Salman Rushdie as they carry an effigy of Rushdie, before burning it during a demonstration in Srinagar, India, Thursday, June 21, 2007. Britain will not apologize for its decision to bestow a knighthood on writer Salman Rushdie, the home secretary said Wednesday, highlighting the need to protect freedom of expression in literature and politics. Britain's decision to award Rushdie a knighthood has caused an uproar in parts of the Muslim world, where many accuse the author of insulting Islam in his novel 'The Satanic Verses.' (AP Photos/ Rafiq Maqbool)


Activists of Jammu Kashmir Peoples Freedom League shout slogans against Britain and writer Salman Rushdie as they carry an effigy of Rushdie, before burning it during a demonstration in Srinagar, India, Thursday, June 21, 2007. Britain will not apologize for its decision to bestow a knighthood on writer Salman Rushdie, the home secretary said Wednesday, highlighting the need to protect freedom of expression in literature and politics. Britain's decision to award Rushdie a knighthood has caused an uproar in parts of the Muslim world, where many accuse the author of insulting Islam in his novel 'The Satanic Verses.' (AP Photos/ Rafiq Maqbool)


A Kashmiri girl looks at an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie before the start of a protest in Srinagar June 21, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Srinagar on Thursday to denounce a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. The placard on the effigy reads, "Hang apostate Salman Rushdie". REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Kashmiri protesters burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Srinagar June 21, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Srinagar on Thursday to denounce a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. The placard on effigy reads "Hang apostate Salman Rushdie". REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Activists of Jammu Kashmir Peoples Freedom League burn an effigy of writer Salman Rushdie, during a demonstration in Srinagar, India, Thursday, June, 21, 2007. Britain will not apologize for its decision to bestow a knighthood on writer Salman Rushdie, the home secretary said Wednesday, highlighting the need to protect freedom of expression in literature and politics. Britain's decision to award Rushdie a knighthood has caused an uproar in parts of the Muslim world, where many accuse the author of insulting Islam in his novel 'The Satanic Verses.' (AP Photos/ Rafiq Maqbool)


Kashmiri protesters burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Srinagar June 21, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Srinagar on Thursday to denounce a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Activists of Jammu Kashmir Peoples Freedom League shout slogans against Britain and writer Salman Rushdie as they burn an effigy of Rushdie, during a demonstration in Srinagar, India, Thursday, June, 21, 2007. Britain will not apologize for its decision to bestow a knighthood on writer Salman Rushdie, the home secretary said Wednesday, highlighting the need to protect freedom of expression in literature and politics. Britain's decision to award Rushdie a knighthood has caused an uproar in parts of the Muslim world, where many accuse the author of insulting Islam in his novel 'The Satanic Verses.' (AP Photos/ Rafiq Maqbool)


Indian Kashmiris burn effigies of British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Srinagar. Muslim anger flared after Britain defended Rushdie's knighthood, with fresh protests against the novelist and Pakistani clerics bestowing a title on Osama bin Laden in response.(AFP/Irshad Khan)


Activists of Islamic parties chant slogans against British author Salman Rushdie in Peshawar June 21, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide. The placard reads "Salman Rushdie is condem to death." REUTERS/Ali Imam (PAKISTAN)


Activists of Islamic parties chant slogans against British author Salman Rushdie, in Peshawar June 21, 2007. Angry protesters took to the streets in Pakistan and Malaysia on Wednesday to denounce a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses"outraged Muslims worldwide. The placard reads "Salman Rushdie is condem to death." REUTERS/Ali Imam (PAKISTAN)


An activist of the Pakistan Awami Tehrik party takes part in a protest against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 21, 2007. A group of hardline Pakistani Muslim clerics has bestowed a religious title on Osama bin Laden in response to a British knighthood for the author Salman Rushdie whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims around the world. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein (PAKISTAN)


Hmm, interesting. Reminds me of something Zombie wrote a while back, now that I think of it.

Activists of Pakistan the Awami Tehrik party take part in a protest against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 21, 2007. A group of hardline Pakistani Muslim clerics has bestowed a religious title on Osama bin Laden in response to a British knighthood for the author Salman Rushdie whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims around the world. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein (PAKISTAN)


Activists of the Pakistan Awami Tehrik party protest against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 21, 2007. A group of hardline Pakistani Muslim clerics has bestowed a religious title on Osama bin Laden in response to a British knighthood for the author Salman Rushdie whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims around the world. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein (PAKISTAN)


"Destroy Peace?" Good point - I think y'all are doing a smashing job of that!

Rushdie whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims around the world. The banners read "awarding knighthood to Rushdie is anti-Islam" REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


Activists of the Jamat Ahle Sunnat party protest against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 21, 2007. A group of hardline Pakistani Muslim clerics has bestowed a religious title on Osama bin Laden in response to a British knighthood for the author Salman Rushdie whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims around the world. The banner reads "hand over Salman Rushdie to Muslims." REUTERS/Zahid Hussein (PAKISTAN)


Activists of the Jamat Ahle Sunnat party protest against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 21, 2007. A group of hardline Pakistani Muslim clerics has bestowed a religious title on Osama bin Laden in response to a British knighthood for the author Salman Rushdie whose novel "The Satanic Verses" outraged many Muslims around the world. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)

 Tags: salman rushdie TROP


Comments:

#1 W.R.Borden 03-Jul-2007
Keep up the good work by exposing these hate mongers for what they really are. Just a bunch of brain washed morons with no life of their own believing in nothing more than a satanic cult established by an illiterate camel driver who was a murderer, a child molester, a thug and a rapist.
Powered by Snarf ยท Contact Us