The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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"Sir" Salman Rushdie: Day of RAGE Edition

Today's the day we've all been waiting for! I'll be documenting the worldwide rage from the Ummah here as photos come in, so be sure to check back every now and then!

VICTORY! It seems that Islamic Rage Boy is joining the anti-Rushdie festivities after all!

Kashmiri protesters shout slogans against British author Salman Rushdie and Britain during a protest in Srinagar June 22, 2007. Indian police in Srinagar used tear gas on Friday to disperse Kashmiri protesters who were denouncing a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN-ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Remember folks, these photos will be coming in all day long. I'll be doing my best to keep up with the flow, but be sure to keep checking back here and reloading every now and then for fresh fun and excitement!

This one is my pick for the day, so far! Hahahah!


In case you get bored, be sure to check out the growing collection of Serial Outrager Parodies, featuring our little friend above!

Status: As of 14:30 EDT, the hottest fires are burning in Pakistan and Kashmir and now, Londonistan. We've also seen a few pictures from Iran, and a brief mention of Indonesia as well, but no big protests so far.

Update: I think this comment, which was just posted to the Day Two thread, is the best:

BOO HOO HOO! MY WITTWE FEEWINGS ARE HURT!
the most tragic and really grave incident of this century... is attacks on a religion,directly or indirectly..the focus is just islaam..n the people who highlight and say about this fact are termed as fanatic..
the action starts from 9|11 attacks ,only blames with no evidences..it was definately a bad incident... but actions n just actions on islam..we can only protest and even if we try that..who doesnt want to sacrifice hislife for his religion and,what is the use of those eyes which cannot stop other devil's eye on his religion..that hand which cannot stop otheR attacking HAND....
to raise a voice for just is right on all religion..killing other person for self defence is not a crime in any relifion so how can defending one's religion is crime anywhere...
we are called as fanatist,terrOrorist...
we are attacked various times verbally or by different means.. we respect all religions...
still the topic is unrevealed to you...i m surprised..
the innumerable attacks... including the latest one.GREAT BRITIAN AWARDS SALNAN RUSHDI TILE OF SIR... AMAZING..FROM GREAT BRITAIN..
THE SAME PERSON WHICH HAS TO BE GIVEN PENALTY OR HANGED IS BEING AWARDED...yeah..forgiveness...only comes to muslims..our religion teaches love ANYONE for ALLAH AND HIS prophet,hatred for ALLAH AND HIS LAST BELOVED Prophet..
I HAVE NOT KNOWN AND HAVENT SEEN HIM BUT GOD IS EVIDENT I DONT EVEN WANT TO SEE HIM...I PRAY TO GOD I MAY NEVER SEE HIM.. AT MY PIOSITION ANY ONE WOULD SAY THIS..
WE MUSLIMS COULD HAVE ASKED FOR HIS PENALtY and killing for the devil's companion..but look at us we are just saying not to award him the title "sir'...can't we be granted as that ..y we are being treated like that..give me any example when a muslim Ruler has done this to any other reiligion AWRDING A PERSON WHO HAS ATTACKED OTHER RELIGION ???? still we are fanatist..
in the consequences..sir title would be seen as the most devilish title and people who have got this and will be given..if they would have love for their religion..which is obvious..would never accept it.. people respect other religions..
it is not the world matter... religion is not a personal matter now its for all....IF THIS IS WAY OF GETTING THE TITLE OF "SIR"USE BAD LANGUAGE FOR OHTER PROPHET AND GET A TITLE IS THE RULE????
we muslims are most respectful to other religions...but we dont have tolerance for wrongdoings. religion..
musilm's eyes brought in tears for years...
not an opology would work for it,a promise from all to all people never blame other religion,never use BAD WORDS FOR OTHER PROPHET,..and people who do this would be given penalTy,SEVERE PUNISHMENT just one law to practice,n peace,love for ALL....IT BRINGS TEARS OF BLOOD.....

WHAT SHOULD WE CALL THIS INCIDENT"REWARDING A DEVIL TITLE OF SIR" .THEN IT IS A TIME TO WAKEUP..N SEE HOW GREAT BRITAIN REWARD PEOPLE WHO ARE FANATIST AND TERRORIST..IS IT MY PERSONAL OPINION??? SEE,LOOK WITHOUT BEING BIASED..
I CANNOT EVEN SAY WHAT IF SOMEONES DOES TO UR RELIGION
N HE IS BEING WARDED LIKE THAT...??TO ME ITS EVEN VERY HURTING..BUT ONCE THE FINGER IS AT UR POSITION..U MIGHT HAVE WRUITTEN MORE THAT THAT... BUT MY IDEA IS NOT TO MAKE ANY ONE FURIOUS,MY BELIEVE IS THAT THE WORDS I HAVE WRITTEN MAYBE MY WAY OF CLOSER TO ALLAH'S PROPHET,HIS LOVE..AS IT IS WRITTEN THERE
WHEN HAZRAT ABRAHIM{A.s}WAS BROUGHT TO FIRE ,TO EXTINGUISH THE FIRE THERE WAS A BIRD WHO HAD A WATER IN HIS BEAK TO EXTINGUISH FIRE,HE SAID I MIGHT NOT ABLE TO EXTINGUISH THE FIRE,BUT WHEN ON THE DAY OF JUDGEMENT GOD WOULD ASK FOR MY WORK? WHERE WAS I? I CAN ANSWER I HAVE MY CONTRIBUTION TOO...
SEE THIS IS A SMALL DROP..BUT REALLY THE DROPS MAKE SEA..ONE DROP BY ALL OF US WOULD STOP SUCH EVILS FOREVER....


Lay off the caffeine, good sir. It'd do your heart some good.

See-Also:

Day Four, Day Three, Day Two, Day One

Pakistan



Activists of Pakistan Awami Tehreek (PAT) carry banners and party flags as they march during an anti-Britain protest rally in Lahore. Angry Islamists protested against Britain's knighthood for Salman Rushdie, as an Iranian cleric said the death sentence on the writer was still valid 18 years on.(AFP/Arif Ali)


Pakistanis carry placards as they chant anti-Britain slogans during a protest rally in Islamabad. Angry Islamists protested against Britain's knighthood for Salman Rushdie, as an Iranian cleric said the death sentence on the writer was still valid 18 years on.(AFP/Aamir Qureshi)


Pakistan's opposition leader cleric Fazalur Rehman addresses a rally to condemn the British government for awarding knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie in Islamabad, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. Rehman said that the British government challenged the whole Muslim world by awarding Rushdie. (AP Photo/B.K.Bangash)


(The above is one of the leaders responsible for whipping crowds like these into this kind of frenzy.)

Pakistan's opposition leader cleric Fazalur Rehman addresses a rally to condemn the British government for awarding knighthood to British author Salman Rushdie in Islamabad, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. Rehman said that British government challenged the whole Muslim world by awarding Rushdie. (AP Photo/B.K.Bangash)


Activists of Pakistan Awami Tehreek chanting anti-Britain slogans during a protest rally in Islamabad. Hundreds of Islamists burned effigies of Queen Elizabeth and Salman Rushdie in Pakistan as the country's parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the novelist's knighthood.(AFP/Aamir Qureshi)


Wow, even Mario and Luigi are involved! (see above)

Activists of Jamat-e-Islami party chant slogans against British author Salman Rushdie in Multan June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer (PAKISTAN)



Pakistani Muslims torch a British flag during an anti-Britain protest rally in Lahore. Angry Islamists protested against Britain's knighthood for Salman Rushdie Friday, as an Iranian cleric said the death sentence on the writer was still valid 18 years on.(AFP/Arif Ali)


I call these next two pictures, "The Ummah's Contribution to Society."

Activists of Jamat-e-Islami party burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie in Multan June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer (PAKISTAN)


Activists of Jamat-e-Islami party burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie in Multan June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Asim Tanveer (PAKISTAN)


Activists of opposition Islamic alliance Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) protest against British author Salman Rushdie, in Karachi June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


Activists of the opposition Islamic alliance Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) protest against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


Activists of opposition Islamic alliance Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) chant slogans against British author Salman Rushdie, in Karachi June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


Activists of opposition Islamic alliance Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) chant slogans against British author Salman Rushdie in Karachi June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN)


This next one is Allah's favourite. He is all-knowing, after all!

Muslim anger flared Thursday after Britain defended Salman Rushdie's knighthood, with fresh protests against the novelist and Pakistani traders offering a big reward for his beheading.(AFP/Aamir Qureshi)


Pakistani traders carry placards and shout anti-Britain slogans during a protest rally in Islamabad. Muslim anger flared Thursday after Britain defended Salman Rushdie's knighthood, with fresh protests against the novelist and Pakistani traders offering a big reward for his beheading.(AFP/Aamir Qureshi)


Pakistani traders carry placards and shout anti-Britain slogans during a protest rally in Islamabad. Muslim anger flared Thursday after Britain defended Salman Rushdie's knighthood, with fresh protests against the novelist and Pakistani traders offering a big reward for his beheading.(AFP/Aamir Qureshi)


Lahore, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. About 2,000 Pakistanis rallied across Pakistan against Rushdie's knighthood, calling for the author to be killed and for a boycott of trade with Britain. (AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary)


A Pakistani religious student shouts slogans at a rally to condemn the Briton government for awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdiehi, in Lahore, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. About 2,000 Pakistanis rallied across Pakistan against Rushdie's knighthood, calling for the author to be killed and for a boycott of trade with Britain. (AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary)


Pakistan's protesters burn an effigy representing Britain's Queen Elizabeth II at rally to condemn the British government's for awarding of a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie in Lahore, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. About 2,000 Pakistanis rallied across Pakistan against Rushdie's knighthood, calling for the author to be killed and for a boycott of trade with Britain. (AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary)


Pakistan's protesters burn a representation of British author Salman Rushdie at rally to condemn his knighthood award in Lahore, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. About 2,000 Pakistanis rallied across Pakistan on Friday against Salman Rushdie's knighthood, calling for the author to be killed and for a boycott of trade with Britain. (AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary)


Pakistan's protesters burn an effigy of their President Gen. Pervez Musharraf with 'Enemy and traitor of Islam,' written on it at rally to condemn the Briton government for awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdiehi in Lahore, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. About 2,000 Pakistanis rallied across Pakistan against Rushdie's knighthood, calling for the author to be killed and for a boycott of trade with Britain. (AP Photo/K.M.Chaudary)


Activists of Jamiat Ulma-e-Islam party burn a mock British flag as they protest against author Salman Rushdie in Quetta June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Rizwan Saeed (PAKISTAN)


Pakistani protesters burn an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie at rally to condemn the British government for awarding a knighthood to him in Multan, Pakistan on Friday, June 22, 2007. About 2,000 Pakistanis rallied across Pakistan against Rushdie's knighthood, calling for the author to be killed and for a boycott of trade with Britain. (AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer)


Pakistan's opposition leader in the National Assembly Fazalur Rehman (C) speaks during a protest rally to condemn the British government, in Islamabad June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologies for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/stringer (PAKISTAN)


Protestors burn an effigy of Britain's Queen Elizabeth in Lahore June 22, 2007. Hundreds of Pakistanis protested against a British knighthood for author Salman Rushdie on Friday as their parliament renewed a call for Britain to withdraw the title and apologise for hurting Muslim feelings. REUTERS/Mohsin Raza (PAKISTAN)


India (Jammu/Kashmir)



Muslim protestors walk on a poster of British Prime Minister Tony Blair and shout slogans against author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Jammu, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)


Muslim protestors carry an effigy of British author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Jammu, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Muslims angered by Britain's decision to honor Rushdie with a knighthood were rallying Friday, warning anger over the award could match the fierce reaction to publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in Denmark in 2006. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)


Muslim protestors burn a poster of author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Jammu, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)


Muslim protestor burn an effigy of author Salman Rushdie during a protest in Jammu, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)


Kashmiri protesters throw stones at Indian policemen during a protest against British author Salman Rushdie and Britain in Srinagar June 22, 2007. Indian police in Srinagar used tear smoke on Friday to disperse Kashmiri protesters who were denouncing a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN-ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Indian policemen chase Kashmiri Muslim protesters, unseen, during a protest against Britain and author Salman Rushdie in Srinagar, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool)


A Kashmiri protester runs from tear gas fired by Indian police during a protest against British author Salman Rushdie and Britian in Srinagar June 22, 2007. Indian police in Srinagar used tear gas on Friday to disperse Kashmiri protesters who were denouncing a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN-ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Kashmiri protesters try to shield themselves from tear gas fired by Indian police during a protest against author Salman Rushdie and Britain in Srinagar June 22, 2007. Indian police on Friday used tear gas to disperse Kashmiri protesters denouncing a British knighthood awarded to Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Kashmiri Muslim protesters shout slogans against Britain and author Salman Rushdie during a demonstration in Srinagar, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool)


Kashmiri Muslim protesters shout slogans against Britain and author Salman Rushdie during a demonstration in Srinagar, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to author Salman Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool)


An Indian policeman wears a helmet during a protest against British author Salman Rushdie in Srinagar June 22, 2007. Indian police in Srinagar used tear gas on Friday to disperse Kashmiri protesters who were denouncing a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN-ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Kashmiri Muslim protesters throw stones at police officers during a protest against Britain and author Salman Rushdie in Srinagar, India, Friday, June, 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)


A Muslim protestor shouts slogans against author Salman Rushdie, seen in poster in background, during a protest in Jammu, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)


That last guy gets an honourable mention for doing a good impression of an aspiring tenor.

A Kashmiri leans out of his house to watch a protest against British author Salman Rushdie and Britain in Srinagar June 22, 2007. Indian police in Srinagar used tear gas on Friday to disperse Kashmiri protesters who were denouncing a British knighthood for Rushdie, whose novel "Satanic Verses" outraged Muslims worldwide. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN-ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)


Kashmiri protestors throw stones as they stage a demonstration against Salman Rushdie in Srinagar. Angry Islamists protested against Britain's knighthood for Rushdie Friday, as an Iranian cleric said the death sentence on the writer was still valid 18 years on.(AFP)


Muslim protestors hold posters of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, half seen left bottom, and U.S. President George W. Bush, right, before burning them, as they shout slogans against author Salman Rushdie, seen in poster in background, during a protest in Jammu, India, Friday, June 22, 2007. Most shops, offices and schools were closed Friday in India's Muslim-majority Kashmir region to protest Britain awarding a knighthood to Rushdie, who has been accused of insulting Islam. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)


Indonesia



An Indonesian woman quietly studies the Koran as residents pass by outside a small mosque Friday June 22, 2007, in Jakarta, Indonesia. Although Indonesian authorities expressed regret Thursday over the granting of a British knighthood to author Salman Rushdie, there has been no popular outcry in the mostly moderate Muslim country. A 2006 survey revealed that more than 80 percent of the Indonesian population strongly condemned tactics used by al-Qaida and affiliated terrorist network Jemaah Islamiyah and favored peaceful democracy.(AP Photo/Ed Wray)


Iran



An Iranian woman looks on as she waits for Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. A prominent Iranian cleric said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. The comments by Ahmad Khatami at Friday prayers broadcast on state radio were the latest sign of the anger in Iran and elsewhere in the Muslim world sparked by Britain's decision to award a knighthood to Rushdie. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


An Iranian woman sits at a university as she waits for Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. A prominent Iranian cleric said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. The comments by Ahmad Khatami at Friday prayers broadcast on state radio were the latest sign of the anger in Iran and elsewhere in the Muslim world sparked by Britain's decision to award a knighthood to Rushdie. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


An Iranian girl stands next to her mother as they leave a university after Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. A prominent Iranian cleric said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. The comments by Ahmad Khatami at Friday prayers broadcast on state radio were the latest sign of the anger in Iran and elsewhere in the Muslim world sparked by Britain's decision to award a knighthood to Rushdie. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


An Iranian woman sits at a university as she waits for Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. A prominent Iranian cleric said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. The comments by Ahmad Khatami at Friday prayers broadcast on state radio were the latest sign of the anger in Iran and elsewhere in the Muslim world sparked by Britain's decision to award a knighthood to Rushdie. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


Iranian worshippers shout anti-Britain and anti-Salman Rushdie slogans after Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. A prominent Iranian cleric said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. The comments by Ahmad Khatami at Friday prayers broadcast on state radio were the latest sign of the anger in Iran and elsewhere in the Muslim world sparked by Britain's decision to award a knighthood to Rushdie. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


Iranian cleric Ahmad Khatami delivers a sermon during Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. Khatami said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


Iranian cleric Ahmad Khatami delivers a sermon during Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. Khatami said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


Members of Iran's Air force shout anti-Britain slogans during Friday prayers in Tehran June 22, 2007. A prominent Iranian cleric said on Friday the fatwa death warrant against author Salman Rushdie issued by the late Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989 was "still alive" in the Islamic Republic. The comments by Ahmad Khatami at Friday prayers broadcast on state radio were the latest sign of the anger in Iran and elsewhere in the Muslim world sparked by Britain's decision to award a knighthood to Rushdie. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN)


Londonistan


My my my, these look like such nice people!

Muslims protest outside Regents Park Mosque in central London against the knighthood of Salman Rushdie. Friday June 22, 2007. Muslims angered by Britain's decision to honor author Salman Rushdie with a knighthood held a rally in London Friday, warning the furor threatens to match the fierce reaction to publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in Denmark in 2006. Also Friday, a high-level Iranian hard-line cleric declared that the religious edict calling for Rushdie's killing remains in place and cannot be revoked, and he warned Britain was defying the Islamic world by granting the honor. (AP Photo/Will Wintercross)


Muslims protest outside Regents Park Mosque in central London against the knighthood of Salman Rushdie. Friday June 22, 2007. Muslims angered by Britain's decision to honor author Salman Rushdie with a knighthood held a rally in London Friday, warning the furor threatens to match the fierce reaction to publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in Denmark in 2006. Also Friday, a high-level Iranian hard-line cleric declared that the religious edict calling for Rushdie's killing remains in place and cannot be revoked, and he warned Britain was defying the Islamic world by granting the honor. (AP Photo/Will Wintercross)


Female Muslims stand behind their placards as they protest outside Regents Park Mosque in central London against the knighthood of Salman Rushdie. Friday June 22, 2007. Muslims angered by Britain's decision to honor author Salman Rushdie with a knighthood held a rally in London Friday, warning the furor threatens to match the fierce reaction to publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in Denmark in 2006. Also Friday, a high-level Iranian hard-line cleric declared that the religious edict calling for Rushdie's killing remains in place and cannot be revoked, and he warned Britain was defying the Islamic world by granting the honor. (AP Photo/Will Wintercross)


A copy of the Quran, the Muslim holy book, is held in front of a placard as Muslims protest outside Regents Park Mosque in central London against the knighthood of Salman Rushdie. Friday June 22, 2007. Muslims angered by Britain's decision to honor author Salman Rushdie with a knighthood held a rally in London Friday, warning the furor threatens to match the fierce reaction to publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in Denmark in 2006. Also Friday, a high-level Iranian hard-line cleric declared that the religious edict calling for Rushdie's killing remains in place and cannot be revoked, and he warned Britain was defying the Islamic world by granting the honor. (AP Photo/Will Wintercross)


Muslims protest outside Regents Park Mosque in central London against the knighthood of Salman Rushdie. Friday June 22, 2007. Muslims angered by Britain's decision to honor author Salman Rushdie with a knighthood held a rally in London Friday, warning the furor threatens to match the fierce reaction to publication of cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in Denmark in 2006. Also Friday, a high-level Iranian hard-line cleric declared that the religious edict calling for Rushdie's killing remains in place and cannot be revoked, and he warned Britain was defying the Islamic world by granting the honor. (AP Photo/Will Wintercross)

 Tags: salman rushdie Your Protest Stinks


Comments:

#1 Sticky Notes 22-Jun-2007
Rage Boy certainly has a look, doesn't he? Sorta rabid. In a bad way.
#2 malm 22-Jun-2007
The Iranian Air Force guys obviously are just "going through the motions" Notice that a couple guys in the center left appear to be completely cracking up over something, and another guy at center right looks like he needs an aspirin.
#3 Hucklebuck 22-Jun-2007
What is that guy in the fifth Iran pic wearing? Is that a plaid shirt? I knew those damn Scots would be behind this if we just looked deeply enough. This is the sort of rampaging Presbyterianism that I've been dreading.
#4 postpolitical 25-Jun-2007

(photo: marknicodemo.mu)
On Saturday, Baron Bodissey at Gates of Vienna picked up a report from SIAD in Denmark, that there was a plan afoot to modify the traditional burning of an effigy of a witch, on St. Hans Day.
According to SIAD, a previously se...
#5 michael larocke 28-Jun-2007
all those pictures are soo rages of isam... Those Isam all are 666 which they wrote n bible... they shold never lives in other country must stay where they live and leaves inncents alone
#6 Hapkido 29-Jun-2007
I tell you, they're photo-op obsessed! Honestly, if the cameras weren't there - and, by reasoning, the left-wing media as well - I suspect these extremists would have little outrage to express.

If a tree falls in the woods & crushes a protesting extremist, does anyone care?
#7 small dead animals 30-Jun-2007
Sir Salman Rushdie, celebrated....
#8 Whargoul 30-Jun-2007
When you see things like this it really makes it hard to believe when people say:"Islam is a peaceful and tolerant religion."
#9 Johann 07-Jul-2007
Why do they have all this time to protest these stupid things? Shouldn't they be out at work, earning money for their little jihadis and blowing dead goats like Allah?
#10 USpace 08-Jul-2007
Rage Boy is a classic, maybe he'll go on Oprah...

absurd thought -
God of the Universe says
let extremists rule

they will drag your country
back to seventh century
.
#11 Brian H 03-Aug-2007
You quoted a commenter from Day Two, and then recommended that he back off on the caffeine; that seems like a misdiagnosis to me. Much more likely PHP (Angel Dust, aka horse tranquilizer).
#12 Brian C. Ledbetter 03-Aug-2007
Good point! I'm definitely not claiming to have any medical expertise here or anything! :)

Regards,
Brian
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