The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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Happy Day: Libyan AIDS Trial Comes to a Close

It would appear that the Libyan shakedown is complete. After having its debts over the past 60 years forgiven, and potentially an "unnamed" cash payout, the six medics wrongfully convicted of infecting Libyan children with AIDS and sentenced to death have been released, and are now home in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Bulgarian medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrive at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrived in Sofia on Tuesday after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. REUTERS/Nikolay Doychinovn (BULGARIA)
Bulgarian nurse Vania Cherveniashka hugs a relative during the arrival of the Bulgarian medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrived in Sofia on Tuesday after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. REUTERS/Nikolay Doychinovn (BULGARIA)


Bulgarian medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrive at Sofia airport July 24, 2007.Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrived in Sofia on Tuesday after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. REUTERS/Nikolay Doychinovn (BULGARIA)


Bulgarian doctor Zdravko Georgiev (L), who was the only one acquitted in the HIV trial in Libya and is the husband of one of the convicted nurses, Christiana Valcheva, waves to well-wishers after the medics' arrival at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. (Stoyan Nenov/Reuters)


Bulgarian nurse Valia Cherveniashka (in pink shirt), one of the Bulgarian nurses convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV, is welcomed by a relative after their arrival at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. (Nikolay Doychinov/Reuters)


Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrive in Sofia July 24, 2007 after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. (Reuters TV/Reuters)


The Bulgarian nurses and medic pose after their arrival in the Bulgarian capital Sofia, Tuesday, July, 24, 2007. Five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian doctor were pardoned by President Georgi Parvanov on arrival in Sofia on Tuesday, after spending 8 years in prison in Libya. The medics, sentenced to life in prison in Libya for contaminating children with the AIDS virus, arrived on board a plane with French first lady Cecilia Sarkozy and the EU's commissioner for foreign affairs, Benita Ferrero-Waldner.(AP Photo)


Bulgarian doctor Zdravko Georgiev (L), who was the only one acquitted in the HIV trial in Libya, and his wife Christiana Valcheva, who is one of the convicted nurses, wave after the medics arrival at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrived in Sofia on Tuesday after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov (BULGARIA)


Bulgarian doctor Zdravko Georgiev, who was the only one acquitted in the HIV trial in Libya and is the husband of one of the convicted nurses, Christiana Valcheva, waves to well-wishers after the medics' arrival at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrived in Sofia on Tuesday after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov (BULGARIA)


Bulgarian doctor Zdravko Georgiev, who was the only one acquitted in the HIV trial in Libya and is the husband of one of the convicted nurses, Christiana Valcheva, waves to well-wishers after the medics' arrival at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrived in Sofia on Tuesday after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov (BULGARIA)


Bulgarian nurse Valia Cherveniashka (in pink shirt), one of the Bulgarian nurses convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV, is welcomed by a relative after their arrival at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. REUTERS/Nikolay Doychinov (BULGARIA)


France's First Lady Cecilia Sarkozy (C) and EU External Relations Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner (L) arrive at Sofia airport together with six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV, July 24, 2007.REUTERS/Nikolay Doychinovn (BULGARIA)


Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrive in Sofia July 24, 2007 in this video grab after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. (Reuters TV/Reuters)


Bulgarian nurse Valentina Manolova Siropulo hugs an unidentified relative after thearrival of the five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian born doctor in the capital Sofia, Tuesday, July, 24, 2007. All were pardoned by President Georgi Parvanov on Tuesday, after spending 8 years in prison in Libya. The medics, sentenced to life in prison in Libya for contaminating children with the AIDS virus, arrived on board a plane with French first lady Cecilia Sarkozy and the EU's commissioner for foreign affairs, Benita Ferrero-Waldner. Bulgaria made an official request Thursday for Tripoli to repatriate the medics to serve their sentences in Bulgaria. It granted citizenship to the Palestinian doctor last month. (AP Photo)


Bulgarian doctor Zdravko Georgiev (top), who was the only one acquitted in the HIV trial in Libya and is the husband of one of the convicted nurses, Christiana Valcheva, is hugged by a well-wisher after the medics arrival at Sofia airport July 24, 2007. Six foreign medics convicted of infecting Libyan children with HIV arrived in Sofia on Tuesday after being freed by Libya under a deal with the European Union. REUTERS/Nikolay Doychinov (BULGARIA)


Bulgarian nurse Kristiana Malinova Valcheva, center, is carried by an unidentified man in front of the French presidential aircraft after their arrival in the Bulgarian capital Sofia, Tuesday, July, 24, 2007. Five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian doctor were pardoned by President Georgi Parvanov on arrival in Sofia on Tuesday, after spending 8 years in prison in Libya. The medics, sentenced to life in prison in Libya for contaminating children with the AIDS virus, arrived on board a plane with French first lady Cecilia Sarkozy and the EU's commissioner for foreign affairs, Benita Ferrero-Waldner. (AP Photo)

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