The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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The incredible relocatable protest

Is that Flatima?
Is it Lebanon? Or San Francisco? Perhaps it's Washington, DC.

I really can't tell. Click on the "Read More" link below to find the (hopefully) obvious answer. And then ask yourself how original the Left really is.

(The wires, thankfully, are identifying this as a protest organized by Hezbullah. At least we're not expected to believe it's spontaneous, as the press here in the United States tries to portray leftist protests here as...)

Oh, and let's be clear here: These people are not "Anti-War" protesters, by any stretch of the imagination. They're perfectly happy with war, especially on Israel—but are also very happy to wage war against the rest of what they view as an "imperialistic" Western world.

If one side wants war, and the other side is too cowardly to fight back, which side do you suppose will win?

One thing's for certain:—The press is not on the same side as the West.
A woman carries a banner denouncing British Prime Minister Tony Blair during a demonstration in Beirut to protest against his visit to Lebanon. Blair has pledged help in rebuilding war-ravaged Lebanon during his first visit to Beirut but was confronted by angry protests over his stance on the Israel-Hezbollah conflict.(AFP/Marwan Naamani)


Hundreds of demonstrators have protested against Prime Minister Tony Blair's visit to Beirut, charging he had blood on his hands for backing Israel in its war with Hezbollah.(AFP/Marwan Naamani)


A protester holds a banner as he takes part in a demonstration against the visit of British Prime Minister Tony Blair to Lebanon, in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, Sept. 11, 2006. Thousands of protesters shouted angry chants and accused British Prime Minister Tony Blair of complicity in last month's Israeli bombardment of Lebanon as he arrived Monday in a country still reeling from 34 days of fighting. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)


A protester holds a banner with Arabic writing reading ' Blair.. You are a killer. Go away' during a demonstration against the visit of British Prime Minister Tony Blair to Lebanon, in Beirut, Monday, Sept. 11, 2006. Thousands of protesters shouted angry chants and accused British Prime Minister Tony Blair of complicity in last month's Israeli bombardment of Lebanon as he arrived Monday in a country still reeling from 34 days of fighting. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)


Protesters raise their hands (Ed: Should read, "Like the good little NAZIs that they are") as they chant slogans during a demonstration against the visit of British Prime Minister Tony Blair to Lebanon, in Beirut, Monday, Sept. 11, 2006. Thousands of protesters shouted angry chants and accused British Prime Minister Tony Blair of complicity in last month's Israeli bombardment of Lebanon as he arrived Monday in a country still reeling from 34 days of fighting. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)


Obligatory reference to the widely-disputed Qana "massacre" (What's a "wgly" face?):

A protester waves a Lebanese flag as she stands behind a banner during a demonstration against the visit of British Prime Minister Tony Blair to Lebanon, in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, Sept. 11, 2006. Thousands of protesters shouted angry chants and accused British Prime Minister Tony Blair of complicity in last month's Israeli bombardment of Lebanon as he arrived Monday in a country still reeling from 34 days of fighting. In the banner 'Kana's children' refers to the victims of the Israeli airstrike Sunday, July 30, 2006, that killed 29 Lebanese, mostly women and children, when it leveled a building in the southern Lebanese village of Qana, where they had taken shelter. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)


Lebanese women wave their country's flag and a poster of Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah. British Prime Minister Tony Blair has pledged help in rebuilding war-ravaged Lebanon during his first visit to Beirut but was confronted by angry protests over his stance on the Israel-Hezbollah conflict.(AFP/Anwar Amro)


Protestors attend a demonstration, organised by Hizbollah, against Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair in Beirut September 11, 2006. Hundreds of Lebanese protested against Blair's visit to Beirut on Monday, accusing him of backing Israel's 34-day war with Hizbollah guerrillas. Troops, riot police and barbed-wire barriers kept the demonstrators well away from the government building in downtown Beirut where Blair was meeting Lebanon's Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause (LEBANON)


Protestors wear Hizbollah scarves and carry Lebanese flags during a demonstration, organised by Hizbollah, against the visit of Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair in Beirut September 11, 2006. Hundreds of Lebanese protested against Blair's visit to Beirut on Monday, accusing him of backing Israel's 34-day war with Hizbollah guerrillas. Troops, riot police and barbed-wire barriers kept the demonstrators well away from the government building in downtown Beirut where Blair was meeting Lebanon's Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause (LEBANON)


Protestors wave Lebanese flags during a demonstration, organised by Hizbollah, against the visit of Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair in Beirut September 11, 2006. Hundreds of Lebanese protested against Blair's visit to Beirut on Monday, accusing him of backing Israel's 34-day war with Hizbollah guerrillas. Troops, riot police and barbed-wire barriers kept the demonstrators well away from the government building in downtown Beirut where Blair was meeting Lebanon's Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause (LEBANON)


Protestors carry posters with slogans against British Prime Minister Tony Blair and a picture of Hizbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah during a demonstration organised by Hizbollah in Beirut September 11, 2006. Hundreds of Lebanese protested against Blair's visit to Beirut on Monday, accusing him of backing Israel's 34-day war with Hizbollah guerrillas. Troops, riot police and barbed-wire barriers kept the demonstrators well away from the government building in downtown Beirut where Blair was meeting Lebanon's Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir (LEBANON)


As I call it, a "Target-Rich Environment:"

Protesters pack a street as they wave Lebanese flags and hold banners during a demonstration against the visit of British Prime Minister Tony Blair to Lebanon, in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, Sept. 11, 2006. Angry protesters _ including an Irish peace activist who disrupted a news conference Monday _ marred a visit by British Prime Minister Tony Blair, who had sided with Washington against a quick cease-fire in the Israeli-Hezbollah conflict. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Tawil)

 Tags: alvaro barrientos anwar amro marwan naamani mohammed azakir reinhard krause AP AFP REUTERS Israel/Lebanon War 2006


Comments:

#1 captainfish 11-Sep-2006
I thought the unnamed lady was british; now she is irish?

I love the signs:
Blair. Bush. Olmert: three corns of the devil. (??? the devil raises corn?)

cheering for USA = hating U.K (?? so, they like USA?)

thank you blair for delivering the intelligent bombs. (eh?)

blair, you killer go to hell. (so, does that mean hezballah killers are going to hell too?)

blair, you are not welcome to Lebanon. (so, guess they dont want UK's money for rebuilding. We should pull our money and aid for as long as they continue to spew hatred for us and our allies who are willing to help them)

so, the throng of well-dressed protesting people rises from "hundreds" to the generic term "thousands". Looks to me like several thousands of fascist-loving freedom-haters.

Wonder which photo will make it to the front pages of MSM?? Think the Nazi-saluting pic will??
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