The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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The smiley coup?

Is this "Candid Camera?"
No, we're not talking about any large-box retailers. Last Friday's military coup in Thailand has seemingly been pulled off without a single casualty, which is remarkable enough, but apparently we're now being told that soldiers are being instructed to "keep smiling."

I wonder if they'll still be smiling once the military junta starts implementing Sharia law... If this junta turns out to be as islamist and dictatorial as I fear it'll be, I also wonder if the media will be as happy to cover their crimes up as they were with Saddam Hussein.

Update 13:12 EST: DTogo on FreeRepublic is suggesting that this coup might actually be a good thing:—that it was the previous Prime Minister that was running a dictatorship, and the people are genuinely happy to be rid of him.

That very well could be the explanation for this. PM Shinawatra was certainly tied to quite a few scandalous instances of corruption. Any Thai readers out there wish to share their thoughts with us?

In the mean time, be sure to check the full article for some of the most humorous photographs from this "Smiley Coup."
A Thai dancing girl gives a rose to a soldier occupying the area around parliament Monday Sept. 25, 2006. The tanks and soldiers who led Thailand's military coup have become a tourist attraction with hundreds of people arriving daily to pose for pictures with them, and vendors selling toys and drinks in a carnival-like atmosphere.(AP Photo/Ed Wray)


A soldier checks a weapon in Bangkok September 25, 2006. Army troops have guarded the Bangkok area since Tuesday night, after a bloodless coup to oust billionaire Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND)


A soldier gives a group of Thai girls some water after they danced to entertain the soldiers occupying the area around parliament in Bangkok, Thailand, Monday, Sept. 25, 2006. The tanks and soldiers who led Thailand's military coup have become a tourist attraction with hundreds of people arriving daily to pose for pictures with them, and vendors selling toys and drinks in a carnival-like atmosphere. (AP Photo/Ed Wray)


A young Thai school girl is lifted by a soldier so that she can touch the barrel of an M60 battle tank Monday, Sept. 25, 2006, at the royal Plaza in Bangkok, Thailand. A revived anti-graft body met Monday to begin an urgent probe into alleged corruption under the fallen government of Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)


Thai school children offer their respects to a soldier as he stands guard near an M60 tank at the Royal Plaza Monday, Sept. 25, 2006, in Bangkok, Thailand. A revived anti-grat body met Monday to begin an urgent probe into alleged corruption under the fallen government of Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)


A baby cries while being photographed with a soldier in Bangkok. Thailand's military leaders have tightened the screws on the ousted government of Thaksin Shinawatra after ordering a series of corruption probes and warning it would seize ill-gotten gains.(AFP/Mike Clarke)


Thai soldiers smile as they are shown photographs of themselves Sunday, Sept. 24, 2006, at the Royal Plaza in Bangkok, Thailand. The Royal Plaza, where the military has stationed more than 10 battle tanks, has become a popular attraction for Thais following last Tuesday's coup that toppled Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. (AP Photo/David Longstreath)


A Thai soldier smiles as he receives flowers from a passer by as he patrols the area near parliament Sunday, Sept. 24, 2006 in Bangkok. Thailand's new military rulers are moving ahead with their corruption investigations, vowing to spare no as they seek to uncover alleged financial wrongdoing by ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and his associates. (AP Photo/Ed Wray)


A Thai soldier salutes a civilian wishing him good luck while riding on a Humvee at Royal Plaza in Bangkok. Thailand's new military rulers have rolled their tanks out of central Bangkok less than five days after a bloodless coup was greeted calmly in the capital.(AFP/Saeed Khan)


A Thai soldier smiles while holding a baby of a visiting family at Royal Plaza in Bangkok. Thailand's new military rulers have rolled their tanks out of central Bangkok less than five days after a bloodless coup was greeted calmly in the capital.(AFP/Saeed Khan)


A soldier poses for pictures with children at Royal Plaza in Bangkok. Thailand's ruling junta drew up a four-man shortlist, including former WTO head Supachai Panitchpakdi, to replace the deposed premier and steer the nation back to democracy, military sources said.(AFP/MIKE CLARKE)


Visitors to the Royal Plaza hold a copy of a newspaper next to soldiers in Bangkok. Thailand's new military rulers have drawn up a four-man shortlist for the country's next premier including former World Trade Organisation head Supachai Panitchpakdi, military sources said.(AFP/MIKE CLARKE)

 Tags: ed wray sukree sukplang sakchai lalit mike clarke david longstreath saeed khan AP REUTERS AFP

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