The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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One man's "protest"

Adnan Hajj would be proud!!
... is still a riot, judging by these pictures!

It looks like it's a busy morning in Lebanon right now. Very interesting, in fact. Hezbullah is beginning their "expansion" of their "open-ended protest," to couch the debate in the terms used by a wholly sympathetic press. Of course, true to their form, their "protest" seems to have entered the traditional "violence phase," but let's not let silly little things like that define them for who they are.

(To the press, "rioting Muslims" is not immediately synonymous with "violence" for some strange reason. That type of terminology only applies to certain politically-unfavoured groups, it seems.)

There's no doubt in my mind that this is a calculated riot intended to re-capture the Western press's attention, and it is orchestrated by a group of people whose singular goal is the total Islamification of Lebanon. Of course, much like our anti-war Western counterparts, there are a handful of useful idiots mixed in the bunch to give a veneer of validity, who will be sorely disappointed when Nasrallah turns the tables on them.

Most of the photos that have come across the wires so far are indistinguishable from your average Palestinian violence, so for the moment, I'll refrain from posting all of them. You'll find the most interesting ones from the bunch beyond the break, though!

Related Articles: Blue Crab Boulevard, Michael Totten, Blogs of War, Jules Crittenden, LGF, The Big Pharaoh, Michelle Malkin, Gulf Coast Pundit

Ace gets Line of the Day for this one:

That's what Israel should have called its campaign against Lebanon -- the 2006 Cross-Border Combined-Arms "Peace Warrior" Protest.

Marketing.
Lebanese soldiers stop stone throwers at the start of a general strike called by the opposition in Kaslik, north of Beirut January 23, 2007. Thousands of Lebanese protesters blocked main roads in Beirut and around the country with rubble and burning tyres on Tuesday at the start of a general strike called by the opposition to try to topple the government. REUTERS/George Abdallah (LEBANON)


Lebanese Red Cross personnel carry a protester who was wounded by stone throwers during a general strike called by the opposition in Kaslik area, north of Beirut January 23, 2007. Thousands of Lebanese protesters blocked main roads in Beirut and around the country with rubble and burning tyres on Tuesday at the start of a general strike called by the opposition to try to topple the government. REUTERS/George Abdallah (LEBANON)


Lebanese soldiers and protesters take cover from stone throwers during a general strike called by the opposition in Kaslik area, north of Beirut January 23, 2007. Thousands of Lebanese protesters blocked main roads in Beirut and around the country with rubble and burning tyres on Tuesday at the start of a general strike called by the opposition to try to topple the government. REUTERS/George Abdallah (LEBANON)


Lebanese soldiers stop a stone thrower during a general strike called by the opposition in Kaslik area, north of Beirut January 23, 2007. Thousands of Lebanese protesters blocked main roads in Beirut and around the country with rubble and burning tyres on Tuesday at the start of a general strike called by the opposition to try to topple the government. REUTERS/George Abdallah (LEBANON)


Lebanese soldiers and armoured personnel carriers stand guard in front of protesters in Dora, east of Beirut January 23, 2007. Thousands of Lebanese protesters blocked main roads in Beirut and around the country with rubble and burning tyres on Tuesday at the start of a general strike called by the opposition to try to topple the government. REUTERS/Wadea Shling (LEBANON)

It should be noted that the photos that Adnan Hajj was busted for looked a lot less scary than this next one:

Black smoke of burning tires and debris raises over Beirut city, Lebanon, Tuesday Jan. 23, 2007. Thousands of opposition protesters blocked roads with burning tires, debris and blazing cars around the Lebanese capital of Beirut and outlying regions of Lebanon on Tuesday, stranding motorists and workers in a bid to enforce a general strike aimed at toppling Prime Minister Fuad Saniora's government. The strike was called by Hezbollah leader Sheik Hassan Nasrallah and other opposition leaders. But Saniora and his pro-government supporters urged all Lebanese to ignore the call. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)


[Ed.: Finally, a little bit of truth in advertising] A protester waves a Hezbollah flag in front of burning tires during a general strike called by the opposition in Sidon, south Lebanon January 23,2007. (Aziz Taher/Reuters)


[Ed.: When all rocks are outlawed, only outlaws will have rocks?] Lebanese soldiers stand on a road leading to south Lebanon in front of stones thrown by protesters during a strike called by the opposition in Khaldeh, south of Beirut January 23, 2007. Thousands of Lebanese protesters blocked main roads in Beirut and around the country with rubble and burning tyres on Tuesday at the start of a general strike called by the opposition to try to topple the government. REUTERS/Aziz Taher (LEBANON)

 Tags: george abdallah wadea shling REUTERS War Watch


Comments:

#1 Blue Crab Boulevard 23-Jan-2007

Hezbollah has stepped up its campaign against the Lebanese government and has shut down Beirut and surrounding areas using barricades and armed men. They are calling it a general strike. It is more than that. It is a coup attempt by any ratio...
#2 Ace of Spades HQ 23-Jan-2007
So, there are some "protests" in Beirut. Makes for some compelling photos that don't need to be photoshopped to look all scary. And yet -- not much media play, and the violence is played down as mere "protests." Why? Because...
#3 Gulf Coast Pundit 23-Jan-2007
Via Michael Totten
He’s linked to blacksmithsoflebanon
Who are local bloggers.
There’s more photography at SnappedShot via BrianL.

...
#4 nbpundit 23-Jan-2007
Found you via Totten. Good work.
#5 Brian 23-Jan-2007
Thank you very much! I've added your blog to my reading list, and look forward to checking out your continuing commentary as well!

Regards,
Brian
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