The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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Selective Outrage Syndrome, Day 2

Protests are heating up in the Middle East, now that the despotic governments there can begin redirecting their citizens' anger at Israel. See here for Day 1 coverage, and see here to learn some background about similar events which evoked absolutely no protest, from either "Palestinians" or their sycophantic supporters in the press.

[Ed.: Just another violent protest... of peace.] Palestinians throw stones at Israeli soldiers during a protest against Israeli excavations near the al-Aqsa Mosque compound in the West bank city of Bethlehem February 6, 2007. Israeli excavation work on Tuesday near an entrance to a compound in Jerusalem that houses the al-Aqsa mosque drew Palestinian protests and Israeli assurances the dig would not harm Islam's third holiest shrine. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte (WEST BANK)

To sum it up: Wantonly destroying artifacts underneath the Temple Mount? Neither newsworthy nor objectionable.

Attempting to preserve these artifacts before they're destroyed by a wholly unnecessary walkway? THOSE EVIL JOOS!

The "Palestinians," and their SHAMELESS cheerleaders in the press, sicken me. As usual, you'll find a comprehensive set of photographs illustrating this selective outrage following the break.
Palestinians throw stones at Israeli soldiers during a protest against Israeli excavations near the al-Aqsa Mosque compound in the West bank city of Bethlehem February 6, 2007. Israeli excavation work on Tuesday near an entrance to a compound in Jerusalem that houses the al-Aqsa mosque drew Palestinian protests and Israeli assurances the dig would not harm Islam's third holiest shrine. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte (WEST BANK)


Palestinians throw stones at Israeli soldiers during a protest against Israeli excavations near the al-Aqsa Mosque compound in the West bank city of Bethlehem February 6, 2007. Israeli excavation work on Tuesday near an entrance to a compound in Jerusalem that houses the al-Aqsa mosque drew Palestinian protests and Israeli assurances the dig would not harm Islam's third holiest shrine. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte (WEST BANK)


A Palestinian Muslim walks by the Golden Dome of the Rock mosque in Jerusalem's old city, Monday, Feb. 5, 2007. In the space of one day, a small archaeological dig in Jerusalem's Old City became a rallying call aimed at uniting Palestinians against Israel. The dig — a few waterlogged sandbags and black buckets of earth behind aluminum walls — is meant to prepare the way for a new pedestrian walkway up to one of the world's most explosive holy sites, the compound known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. (AP Photo / Sebastian Scheiner)


Workers dig in a walkway to the Al Aqsa Mosque compound in east Jerusalem's Old City, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007. Police took up positions throughout the area Tuesday as Israeli archaeologists began digging near a site holy to both Jews and Muslims amid protests and threats from Palestinians. The Israel Antiquities Authority said the work poses no danger to the holy site but Palestinians fear Israel will damage it and have warned the work would inflame tensions. (AP Photo / Sebastian Scheiner)


Israeli policemen stand guard as excavation work continues in front of the Dome of the Rock Mosque (on the right) in the al Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem's Old City February 6, 2007. Israeli excavation work on Tuesday near an entrance to a compound in Jerusalem that houses the al-Aqsa mosque drew Palestinian protests and Israeli assurances the dig would not harm Islam's third holiest shrine. Just below the compound in the picture is the Western wall. REUTERS/Ammar Awad (JERUSALEM)


Ultra-Orthodox Jews watch as a bulldozer works in front of the al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem's Old City February 6, 2007. Israeli excavation work on Tuesday near an entrance to a compound in Jerusalem that houses the al-Aqsa mosque drew Palestinian protests and Israeli assurances the dig would not harm Islam's third holiest shrine. REUTERS/Ammar Awad (JERUSALEM)


Israeli policemen stand guard in front of the al-Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem's Old City February 6, 2007. Israeli excavation work on Tuesday near an entrance to a compound in Jerusalem that houses the al-Aqsa mosque drew Palestinian protests and Israeli assurances the dig would not harm Islam's third holiest shrine. REUTERS/Yonathan Weitzman (JERUSALEM)

Alas, it's impossible for the truth not to come out at this point. These events are 1000% orchestrated—see the following caption:

Muslim worshippers pray at the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem in October 2005. Muslim leaders and Arab politicians have urged Palestinians to rush to the flashpoint Jerusalem mosque compound to protest against Israeli works that they charge threaten the site's foundations.(AFP/File/Awad Awad)

With that being said, let the manufactured protests and gallons of crocodile tears flow forth, as if by magic:

Palestinian women supporting Al-Aqsa Martyrs' Brigades, a group linked to the Fatah movement, gather during a protest against Israeli government's construction works outside the disputed Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in east Jerusalem's Old City, at the Unknown Soldier square in Gaza City, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007. The headband reads in Arabic: There is no God but Allah and Mohammed is his Prophet, Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades . The dig is just outside one of world's most disputed holy places — the hill in the heart of Jerusalem that is known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. The site has been the frequent arena of Israeli-Palestinian fighting and Israel plans to build a new pedestrian ramp to the complex amid protests and threats from Palestinians, saying it wants to ensure the renovation work does not come at the expense of any important artifacts. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)


Palestinian women supporting Al-Aqsa Martyrs' Brigades, a group linked to the Fatah movement, chant slogans as others wave yellow Fatah flags during a protest against the Israeli government's construction works outside the disputed Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in east Jerusalem's Old City, at the Unknown Soldier square in Gaza City, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007. The dig is just outside one of world's most disputed holy places — the hill in the heart of Jerusalem that is known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. The site has been the frequent arena of Israeli-Palestinian fighting and Israel plans to build a new pedestrian ramp to the complex amid protests and threats from Palestinians, saying it wants to ensure the renovation work does not come at the expense of any important artifacts. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)


Palestinian women supporting the Al-Aqsa Martyrs' Brigades, a group linked to the Fatah movement, chant slogans as others wave yellow Fatah flags during a protest against the Israeli government's construction works outside the disputed Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in east Jerusalem's Old City, at the Unknown Soldier square in Gaza City, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007. Their headbands read in Arabic: There is no God but Allah and Mohammed is his Prophet, Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades . The dig is just outside one of world's most disputed holy places — the hill in the heart of Jerusalem that is known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. The site has been the frequent arena of Israeli-Palestinian fighting and Israel plans to build a new pedestrian ramp to the complex amid protests and threats from Palestinians, saying it wants to ensure the renovation work does not come at the expense of any important artifacts. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

Update: Here's some background on why the foundations of the Temple Mount are really at risk, from September 2003.

A year-long dispute between Israel and the Waqf over who will fix the bulge was solved in October with a decision to involve the Jordanian engineers, who inspected and took a sampling of the protruding wall.

A report the engineers subsequently issued recommended replacing some of the eroding stones in the 2,000-year-old wall to prevent it from future collapse.

Israeli archeologists believe the bulge and the new wall collapse are due to unauthorized Waqf construction at an underground area known as Solomon's Stables, located on the other side of the wall. Reports say Muslim authorities are constructing yet another mosque at the Jewish holy site.

Faulty drainage was cited by the Antiquities Authority as the probable cause for the bulge in its report, issued last year.

  Intifada

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