The Ghost of Snapped Shot

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Pakistan's Curious Little Jihadi Problem

Remember that picture from a few days ago of Pakistani terror-supporters giving alms for jihad? In the same city, a "hardliner" Islamic cleric and his band of AK-lugging thugs have taken a group of Pakistani security forces hostage. In response, the Pakistani government has been increasing the number of troops it sends into the area, in an attempt to gain control over some of the lawlessness they're currently experiencing. As if on cue, students from every madrassa in the area have been bussed in to protest against this outrageous show of lawfulness. So what does our ever-helpful press do?

Yeah, you guessed it. Bring on the ouuuuutrage:

Islamic students protest against the government's continued fighting in the northwestern province with Islamic militants in Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, Nov. 2, 2007. Government officials say militants account for most of 180 people killed in fighting around the northwestern province of Swat since 2,500 government militiamen were deployed last week to tackle the followers of pro-Taliban cleric Maulana Fazlullah. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)


See-also:

Sweetness & Light discusses the Geneva Convention aspect of this event
Pakistan has a serious problem with its system of madrassa education. Students who go through these schools are radicalised to a remarkable degree, and often end up aligning themselves with radical, anti-Pakistani clerics bent on creating yet another shari'a state in the region. These schools are funded outright by the Saudi Arabian government, and tend to answer to no amount of oversight from the Pakistani state. (Of course, it goes without saying that the radicals who cynically use these students wouldn't have so much of an interest in Pakistan if it weren't for the fact that Pakistan is a nuclear state... Yeah, thanks for all the help with that, Bill C.)

It should also be noted that this event doubles as a creative use of human shields, for who do we find behind these hastily-arranged children of rage? You guessed it:

Update: Okay, the protest is in Islamabad, whereas the terrorists are in Charabagh, our Jihadi-supporting city from above. My mistake—though, I reckon one could still argue that the children are acting as figurative human shields:

It's time for the Militant Hour Special!

A masked militant supporter of Maulana Fazlullah, a hardline cleric, raises a sword and a knife as he stands guard outside a building, where paramilitary troops from the Frontier Corps are detained, in Charabagh near Mingora, the main town of Pakistan's Swat district bordering Afghanistan, Friday, Nov. 2, 2007. Militants on Friday paraded 48 captives identified as security forces who surrendered during bloody fighting in the northwest Pakistan district of Swat, a region increasingly under the control of pro-Taliban rebels. (AP Photo/ Riaz Khan)


How did these students get here? This first photo speaks volumes.

Islamic students arrive packed in a truck to protest against the government's continued fighting in the northwestern province with Islamic militants in Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, Nov. 2, 2007. Government officials say militants account for most of 180 people killed in fighting around the northwestern province of Swat since 2,500 government militiamen were deployed last week to tackle the followers of pro-Taliban cleric Maulana Fazlullah. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)


(AP Photo/Wally Santana)


(AP Photo/Wally Santana)

(AP Photo/Wally Santana)


(AP Photo/Wally Santana)


(AP Photo/Wally Santana)


(AP Photo/Wally Santana)


You ever notice how radical Islamists only demand "negotiations" when a Western-allied nation is in a strong position? If you're curious as to why this is the standard pattern, you may want to read up on the Islamic concept of Hudna. This is a good example of "hudna" in action:

Islamists from Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam (JUI) shout slogans as they march against a military operation in trouble-hit northwestern Swat Valley during a protest rally in Islamabad November 2, 2007. A firebrand pro-Taliban cleric leading an armed uprising in Pakistan's northwest called on Friday for the withdrawal of troops from the volatile region to pave the way for negotiations to end days of fighting. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed (PAKISTAN)


REUTERS/Mian Khursheed (PAKISTAN)


(AP Photo/Mohammad Zubair)


(AP Photo/Mohammad Zubair)


There are now protests going on in Karachi, Islamabad, and Peshawar. I've got them all mixed up in the listing above—I'll sort them out later, if I get a chance.

Islamists from Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam (JUI) shout slogans during a protest rally in Peshawar as they march against a military operation in trouble-hit northwestern Swat Valley November 2, 2007. A firebrand pro-Taliban cleric leading an armed uprising in Pakistan's northwest called on Friday for the withdrawal of troops from the volatile region to pave the way for negotiations to end days of fighting. REUTERS/Ali Imam (PAKISTAN)


REUTERS/Ali Imam (PAKISTAN)


REUTERS/Ali Imam (PAKISTAN)


REUTERS/Zahid Hussein (PAKISTAN)


Students of a madrasa or religious school pray in Karachi during a demonstration against army action in volatile northwest region of Swat November 2, 2007. A firebrand pro-Taliban cleric on Friday called for the withdrawal of troops from Pakistan's volatile northwest region to open the way for negotiations to end days of fighting. REUTERS/Zahid Hussein (PAKISTAN)


Militants For Peace


Here are more shots of the people who are hiding behind these children.

(AP Photo/ Riaz Khan)


REUTERS/Sherin Zada Kanju (PAKISTAN)


REUTERS/Sherin Zada Kanju (PAKISTAN)


Captive paramilitary troops from Frontier Corps, sit in a room in Charabagh near Mingora, the main town of Pakistan's Swat district bordering Afghanistan, Friday, Nov. 2, 2007. Militants paraded 48 captives identified as security forces who surrendered during bloody fighting in the northwest Pakistan district of Swat, a region increasingly under the control of pro-Taliban rebels. (AP Photo/ Riaz Khan)

 Tags: riaz khan wally santana AP Your Protest Stinks


Comments:

#1 Clayton 02-Nov-2007
Just saw on BBC, all the hostages were released. They gave up because they ran out of food and ammo. One of them was quoted on his release:

"we are not here willingly. These are our muslim brothers"

not exact wording, probably, but you get the point.

They were let go as a gesture of "good will". If they were christian or hindu we'd probably get the first true report of headless bodies being found
#2 michelle 08-Apr-2009
wait - are you part of the VAST ZIONIST CONSPIRACY?

If so, how do I join? As a Jew I feel hurt to be left out of that club.

Also, I couldn't see any of the photos in this post. Mind adding the sources? It's like seeing a play right behind a tall guy with a large head.
#3 Brian C. Ledbetter 08-Apr-2009
Michelle,

Your application is in the mail. ;)

In all seriousness, you're absolutely right: The photos aren't showing up. In this particular case, it's because the aforementioned tall guy came and threatened me. And I have a low tolerance for legal threats.

Respectfully,
Brian

PS: Would [i]love[/i] to hear how you ran across this dinky little site! :)
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