The Ghost of Snapped Shot

Or, welcome to my low-maintenance heck.

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This Is Madness

The Israeli government is truly delusional if it thinks that releasing 429 prisoners (i.e., terrorists) will garner any goodwill from those sworn to destroy it. Mark my words—We'll be seeing yet another protest "demanding" the release of Palestinian "prisoners" by tomorrow.

Released Palestinian prisoners are greeted at Erez crossing in Gaza December 3, 2007, after they were released from an Israeli jail. Israel released 429 Palestinian prisoners on Monday in a bid to bolster President Mahmoud Abbas after a U.S.-sponsored conference last week on Palestinian statehood, Israeli officials said. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem (GAZA)

 Tags: suhaib salem REUTERS Intifada


Comments:

#1 Cletus 03-Dec-2007
Christ, Israel ain't never gonna get it together

unless they are planning a super secret attack plan that is so great that the release of a few hundred prisoners don't matter, cuz they'll probably get killed soon anyway

but I shouldn't get my hopes up
#2 Cletus 04-Dec-2007
they should learn from this:

Israel needs to learn from Russia:
(taken from the wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khankala_Mi-26_disaster)

On August 19, 2002, a Russian-made Igla shoulder-fired surface-to-air missile hit an overloaded Mil Mi-26 helicopter, causing it to crash in a minefield and burn at the main military base at Khankala near the capital city of Grozny, Chechnya.


A total of 127 Russian Army troops and crew from the Russian Air Force base at Mozdok were killed in the crash, the greatest loss of life in the history of helicopter aviation and one of the worst disasters in Russian military history. The separatist news agency Kavkaz Center described the crash as the "greatest act of sabotage by Chechen fighters in two years".

A Day of Mourning was declared by the Russian President Vladimir Putin in connection with the catastrophe. Cultural institutions and television companies were recommended to cancel scheduled entertainment programmes and activities.

[b]The Russian military responded[/b] to the loss of the Mi-26 (as well as two other helicopters that were shot down at approximately the same time) [b]by destroying an entire residential area near Khankala in the outskirts of Grozny[/b] since it was believed that the surface-to-air missiles that destroyed the helicopters were fired from one of the many dilapidated apartment blocks that dotted the area.

Some military officials said [b]the Chechens who were left homeless as a result of the attack were themselves partly to blame, because they had failed to report that militants were preparing attacks from their houses.[/b] The Russian Army spokesmen, Ilya Shabalkin, reported that the action was carried out with the goal of preventing rebels from using the area to lay ambushes close to the Khankala military base. It was also announced that five Chechens "suspected of terrorist ties" were killed during the operation.
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